Maître Afschrift becomes Typhanie - Companies

Maître Afschrift becomes Typhanie – Companies

Advertisements

Advertisements

No longer say tax lawyer, but tax lawyer. Thierry Afschrift has changed gender and is now called Typhanie. Interview.

Why did Typhanie have to wait so long before ousting Thierry?

I have an office in Switzerland and I have been following Typhanie there for a few years now. In Belgium, family questions arose that it is quite easy to guess. It’s not easy when you’re married and when you have children. You have to take your family into account when making decisions…

Does this therefore mean that, until now, you led a “double life”: Typhanie in Switzerland and Thierry in Belgium?

(Laughter) Yes, yes, absolutely! In Switzerland, I was Typhanie and when I returned to Belgium, I was obliged, with regret, to live as Thierry.

What was the click that made you, today, also Typhanie in Belgium?

My youngest son is 14 years old and it is an age from which one begins to understand a certain number of things. It was hard to do that before. It’s a question of torque to settle too…

Precisely, what was the reaction of your loved ones to this change?

My grown-up children reacted wonderfully well, in an extremely positive way, and the rest of my family too. I am very lucky to have a very understanding family. She showed much more than just the passive tolerance that I see in a lot of people and that I completely understand. I had real support from most of my family.

Are you still with your wife?

Yes, but it’s a tricky subject. It’s complicated for her and I totally understand her. I’m not going to speak for her, but anything can happen between us.

At the professional level this time, how did this announcement go?

I was struck by the great maturity and the great tolerance of my professional entourage, be it my partners, my collaborators or my clients. I received a significant number of spontaneous calls from people who knew me to congratulate me, to encourage me or to express their sympathy. I found this quite extraordinary from people who are friends, clients, colleagues, colleagues… In reality, I did not have a negative reaction, even if I am not naive . I think there are people who, without telling me, must have a less positive point of view, but that’s their right. So far, I haven’t had an expression of any unpleasant term from anyone.

Now that this is known, do you still fear negative reactions from more “conservative” customers who may no longer use your services?

You can never swear that no client will be unhappy, but I have my experience of the Swiss office which has grown in importance in recent years and which has seen its turnover increase fivefold during this period. Far from losing customers, I have many more! So I’m not going to say it’s because I’m a woman, but I don’t think it hurt me anyway. On the contrary, I felt quite a lot of sympathy. I think today people are open and we are in a society that is inclusive.

It’s true that in Belgium we have a transgender minister, Petra de Sutter, and that didn’t create a stir…

She showed a way and I have a lot of admiration for her at that level. She has courage and she has effectively shown that in our society it cannot be either a disadvantage or something that can harm a career. Different people should be treated the same. No one should be disadvantaged because of their belonging to a minority or because of who they are.

Was the administrative procedure simple in the change you made?

Frankly, the Belgian procedure is very simple and really accessible to everyone since you don’t need a legal procedure to change gender. It suffices to make two declarations to the municipal administration which must be separated by at least three months, which supposes that one matures his decision a little. I think it’s a very good formula and dates from the transgender law of 2017. This law shows that Belgium is quite ready at this level. It was proposed by an N-VA secretary of state, Zuhal Demir, and everyone was ready to accept it. Belgium was, along with Malta and the Netherlands, one of the countries at the forefront of this development.

In the end, what is the message you want to convey today through this announcement and the resulting media coverage?

What I want to express is that I assume my choice. I am a woman and I present myself as such. I have absolutely no shame, neither of the past nor of the present. I have no reason to hide that I am making this very important change in my life and therefore I am expressing it towards the people I know, the people who are close to me, but also towards the general public. .

Why did Typhanie have to wait so long before ousting Thierry? I have an office in Switzerland and, over there, I have been following Typhanie for a few years already. In Belgium, family questions arose that it is quite easy to guess. It’s not easy when you’re married and when you have children. You have to take your family into account when you make decisions… So does that mean that, until now, you led a “double life”: Typhanie in Switzerland and Thierry in Belgium? (Laughs) Yes, yes, absolutely ! In Switzerland, I was Typhanie and when I came back to Belgium, I was really obliged, with regret, to live as Thierry. What was the trigger that made you, today, also Typhanie in Belgium? My youngest son is 14 years old and it is an age from which one begins to understand a certain number of things. It was hard to do that before. It’s a question of the couple that needs to be settled too… Precisely, what was the reaction of your loved ones to this change? My adult adult children reacted wonderfully well, in an extremely positive way, and the rest of my family too. I am very lucky to have a very understanding family. She showed much more than just the passive tolerance that I see in a lot of people and that I completely understand. I had real support from most of my family. So you’re still with your wife? Yes, but it’s a delicate subject. It’s complicated for her and I totally understand her. I’m not going to speak for her, but anything can happen between us. At the professional level this time, how did this announcement go? I was struck by the great maturity and great tolerance of my professional entourage, whether either my associates, my collaborators or my clients. I received a significant number of spontaneous calls from people who knew me to congratulate me, to encourage me or to express their sympathy. I found this quite extraordinary from people who are friends, clients, colleagues, colleagues… In reality, I did not have a negative reaction, even if I am not naive . I think there are people who, without telling me, must have a less positive point of view, but that’s their right. So far, I haven’t heard any nasty terms from anyone. Now that it’s out, do you still fear negative reactions from more “conservative” customers who may no longer use your services? You can never swear that no customer will be unhappy, but I have my experience of the Swiss office, which has grown in importance in recent years and has seen its turnover increase fivefold during this period. Far from losing customers, I have many more! So I’m not going to say it’s because I’m a woman, but I don’t think it hurt me anyway. On the contrary, I felt quite a lot of sympathy. I think that today people are open and that we are in a society that is inclusive. It is true that in Belgium we have a transgender minister, Petra de Sutter, and that has not caused a stir. …She showed a way and I have a lot of admiration for her on that level. She has courage and she has effectively shown that in our society it cannot be either a disadvantage or something that can harm a career. Different people should be treated the same. No one should be disadvantaged because of their belonging to a minority or because of who they are. Was the administrative procedure simple in the change you made? Frankly, the Belgian procedure is very simple and really accessible to everyone since you don’t need a legal procedure to change gender. It suffices to make two declarations to the municipal administration which must be separated by at least three months, which supposes that one matures his decision a little. I think it’s a very good formula and dates from the transgender law of 2017. This law shows that Belgium is quite ready at this level. It was proposed by an N-VA secretary of state, Zuhal Demir, and everyone was ready to accept it. Belgium was, along with Malta and the Netherlands, one of the countries at the forefront of this development. In the end, what is the message that you want to convey today through this announcement and the resulting media coverage? what I want to express is that I assume my choice. I am a woman and I present myself as such. I have absolutely no shame, neither of the past nor of the present. I have no reason to hide that I am making this very important change in my life and therefore I am expressing it towards the people I know, the people who are close to me, but also towards the general public. .

.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.